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28 May 2019

Vacancy for Biodiversity Specialist, Department of Environment, Antigua and Barbuda: Terms of Reference

....
Closing Date: Fri, 14 Jun 2019

ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA

Department of Environment

 

Terms of Reference

Biodiversity Specialist

Job Title

Biodiversity Specialist(s)

Contracting Authority

Department of Environment, Ministry of Health and the Environment, Antigua and Barbuda

Date of Issue

Friday May 24th 2019

Deadline

Friday June 14th  2019 Late Bids will not be opened and will be returned to Bidder.

Duration

110 days

To Apply

Interested persons are invited to apply for this opportunity. Please email the Procurement Officer at DOE@ab.gov.ag and copied to antiguaenvironmentdivision@gmail.com the following:

Biodiversity Specialist Services

  1. Cover letter
  2. Technical Proposal
  3. Financial Proposal
  4. Contact information for three (3) references

Please use email subject line: “…Application for Biodiversity Specialist”

EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY (EEO)

 

The Department of Environment (DoE) provides equal opportunity and fair and equitable treatment in employment to all people without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, political affiliation, marital status, or sexual orientation. The DoE also strives to achieve equal employment opportunity in all personnel operations through continuing diversity enhancement programs. 

 

Document with images attached at the end of this ad.

 

Terms of Reference

Biodiversity Specialist

  1. About the Department of Environment

 

The Department of Environment is a Government agency within the Ministry of Health and the Environment in the Government of Antigua and Barbuda.

The overall mission of the Department of Environment (DOE) is to provide technical advice on the environment and to design and implement projects on behalf of the Government and the people of Antigua and Barbuda. These interventions are designed to protect and enhance the country's environment, as well as seek common solutions to national, regional and global environmental challenges.

The Department of Environment accomplishes its mission inter alia through:

  • An integrated environmental planning and management system established on the basis of public participation and interagency collaboration,
  • Efficient implementation of appropriate programmes, projects and technical services,
  • Providing accurate council on environmental management as well as effective and consistent enforcement of environmental laws and regulations, and
  • Provide the public with easily accessible information and technical assistance on environmental issues.

The Department of Environment manages projects within four main Programmes, which are aligned with national legislation and international environmental agreements. These are:

  1. Climate Change Programme (Adaptation, Mitigation, and Capacity Building)
  2. Biodiversity Programme
  3. Pollution Programme
  4. Monitoring, Evaluation and Data Management Programme

The DOE has an active portfolio of projects, with project sizes ranging from USD 50K to USD 15 million, with an additional 15 projects under development. Partners of the DOE include UN Environment, UNDP, IUCN, Caribbean Development Bank, Government of Italy, Global Environment Facility, Green Climate Fund, the Adaptation Fund, among others. The DOE was accredited as a direct access entity to the Adaptation Fund in 2015 and to the Green Climate Fund in 2017. The DOE is focused on designing high-impact, transformational projects that maximize funding directly available to the public, private and civil society actors in order to meet an ambitious environmental agenda.

 

  1. Purpose and Objective of Consultancy

 

Project Site Background.

The Shekerley Mountain region in southwestern Antigua extends from Boggy Peak to Midway Peak and Christian Valley (extensive forest cover on the southwest part of Antigua in Figure 1). This area harbours Antigua and Barbuda’s last remaining tropical forest and is the part of the island that receives the most rainfall.

The proposed Shekerley Mountain Management Area (SMMA) will protect an estimated 33% of the country’s total forest cover (estimated at 9,000 ha), and nearly 100% of the area zoned for Forest Conservation. The southwest area of Antigua (including the Shekerley Mountains) contains the majority of the areas on the island designated for use as Forest and Environmental Protection (see Land Use Designation Map below)

 

Figure 1: Existing land use in Antigua and Barbuda (SIRMZP, 2012). The project site is the Shekerley Mountain Management Area (SMMA) on Antigua’s southwest zone, which is the last remaining contiguous forest zone and a unique ecosystem in the country

 

The vegetation of the Shekerley Mountain range is dominated by a mixture of evergreen and deciduous-evergreen forest, lower montane forest within the wetter valleys and sheltered slopes, and drier slopes consisting mostly of woodlands. In total, 15 different types of vegetation communities have been described in this area, in addition to other land uses/types (farming, ponds, gardens, commercial and urban areas).

The dispersed nature of the flora/fauna of the mountain range is representative of the once diverse and rich biodiversity of Antigua. Lower montane forests, which are comparable to rainforest, are not well formed and exist only in small patches (<0.5 hectares) throughout the Shekerley Mountains. These areas host the richest plant communities on the island and mature areas (which mostly remain only within the Shekerley range) provide habitat for the growth of rare forest species including orchids and ferns. Bird numbers in the Shekerley range fluctuate depending on the season, food availability, amount of rainfall, and nesting habitat. North American and European avian fauna arrive in late October to feed on the population explosion of insects that happens due to increased rainfall at this time of the year. Other migrant species of birds may arrive earlier in the year. The native bird species of the Shekerley Mountain range include some of the country’s rarest, most colourful and regional endemic species, including inter alia: Scaly-naped pigeon (Patagioenas squamosa), Brown Trembler (Cinclocerthia ruficauda) and the Purple-throated Carib (Eulampis jugalaris).Around 15 species of reptiles and amphibian species are found within the Shekerley Mountain range, including the Antigua least gecko (Sphaerodactylus elegantulus), which is endemic to the island of Antigua and Barbuda, as well as several regional (and Lesser Antillies) endemic frog species (Eleutherodactylus johnstonei and Eleutherodactylus martinicencis) and the Blind Worm (Typhlops monastus).

The proposed SMMA encompasses two of Antigua and Barbuda’s twelve Key Biodiversity Areas, as identified by the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF), the Walling’s Forest KBA/IBA and the Christian Valley KBA/IBA. Together, these two KBAs/IBAs support populations of nine (of the 11) Lesser Antilles EBA restricted-range birds. Within Antigua, some of these species (Bridled Quail-dove Geotrygon mystacea, Scaly-breasted Thrasher Margarops fuscus, Pearly-eyed Thrasher M. fuscatus and Antillean Euphonia Euphonia musica) are entirely confined to the Walling’s Forest and Christian Valley ecosystem. A significant population of the Near Threatened White-crowned Pigeon Patagioenas leucocephala also occurs.  The Wallings Forest KBA/IBA also supports the largest and best remaining tract of moist evergreen forest on the island, and harbours seven species of bat, including the Near Threatened insular single leaf bat Monophylus plethodon and the Brazilian free-tailed bat Tadarida brasilensis.  The Christian Valley KBA/IBA has not recorded any Globally Threatened or endemic species, but the area has a diverse flora and insect fauna.  In addition, seven bat species (including Antillean fruit-eating bat Brachyphylla cavernarum and greater bulldog bat Noctilio leporinus) have been documented.

The proposed SMMA also encompasses the proposed Boggy Peak National Park (BPNP). The BPNP includes biodiversity from wet and dry forest, plant and bird species to watersheds, outstanding scenery and genetic material for about 28 species of mangoes, and the famous Antiguan black pineapple. In addition, the SMMA is situated above the Cades Bay Marine Reserve, a premier coastal and marine conservation area in the country.

 

 

Figure 3: Map of approximate extent of the proposed Shekerley Mountain Management Area, proximity to local communities, and the boundaries of Boggy Peak National Park, the Dunnings Forest ecosystem, the Wallings Forest Key Biodiversity Area (AG008), and the Christian Valley Key Biodiversity Area (AG0009)

 

The proposed Dunnings Forest Ecosystem is located in one of the most stunning natural areas of Antigua, with a wide and open valley, bordered by peaks with some of the most spectacular views in the region, and an important freshwater catchment area hosting the Dunnings Reservoir.Within this site, seasonal forests persist on the northern and eastern slopes of McNish Mountain, and the northwestern slope has seasonal-evergreen forest, often dominated by the  (Acrocomia aculeate).

Furthermore, the Dunnings ecosystem is under threat of quarrying, which reflects a broader pressure to develop in ecologically sensitive areas. One quarry is already operational in the nearby vicinity, as depicted above on the northeast border of the Dunnings Forest ecosystem sub-watershed boundary. At the same time, Antigua and Barbuda is a country with severe water supply deficits, and the Dunnings Forest area is a vitally important watershed.

 

  1. Scope of Work

 

 

Objectives of the Consultancy;

 

  1. Conduct a Biodiversity Assessment of the Shekerley Mountain Management Area (SMMA).
  2. Study the population of the Tree Bat Ardops nichollsi with the goal of implementing strategies to increase the Tree Bat populations in the Shekerley Mountain area by at least 5%.

 

The scope of work is understood to cover all the activities necessary to accomplish the stated objectives of the project including but not limited to the following:

  1. Conduct a biodiversity assessment of fauna species for the SMMA to establish species management areas for priority species based on IUCN guidelines.
  2. Conduct a population study for the flora species listed in the supporting document entitled “List of Endangered Plants in Antigua” for the SMMA.
  3. Prepare a fauna species list for the SMMA; similar to the List of Endangered Plants list including Scientific Name, Common Name, IUCN status, origin and distribution
  4. Establish the population and distribution of the Tree Bat Ardops nichollsi

 

  1. Deliverables

 

The Specialist will provide the following outputs:

  1. Inception Report
  2. Work Plan
  3. Monthly Report
  4. Final Report

 

  1. Reporting Requirements

 

Under the general supervision of the Project Coordinator, the Specialist will be contracted to undertake and complete the specified activities, outlined in Section 3 – Scope of Work.

Seven (7) working days after the contract or agreement has been signed by the Specialist and the Department of Environment (DoE), the Specialist will submit a detailed Work Plan, inclusive of timelines for the submission of monthly and final reports.

Within fifteen (15) working days of completing the specified scope of work, the Specialist will prepare and submit to the DoE, a Final Report.

The Final Report should be submitted electronically to the Project Coordinator in Microsoft Word. The Final Report should also be accompanied by a signed invoice in the amount claimed by the Specialist in Eastern Caribbean Dollars.  The invoice should include full banking instructions in order to facilitate wire transfer of funds by DoE.

  1. Duration

 

The assignment should not exceed a total of 110 days for the Specialist.

 

 

  1. Required Qualifications and Experience

 

Essential qualifications

  • Advanced university degree (Masters or equivalent) in Biology, Ecology, Environmental Science or any related field.
  • At least three (3) years’ experience working with bat species.
  • At least three (3) years’ experience conducting biodiversity assessments.
  • Must have a positive attitude, strong work ethic, and be able to work well with others in a team setting.
  • Ability to exercise good judgment and discretion when handling confidential situations or materials
  • Demonstrate research, statistical, and analytical skills with ability to recall, retrieve, and communicate detailed information quickly, accurately, and clearly both verbally and in writing
  • Ability to identify strategic issues, opportunities and risks and communicate broad and compelling organizational direction;
  • Ability to work effectively under the pressure of specific timelines and deadlines.
  • Advanced MS Office skills

 

Nonessential but preferred qualifications

  • Excellent English Language skills.
  • Advanced MS Office skills

 

 

  1. Evaluation Criteria

 

The evaluation criteria and weightings that will be applied to this TOR are as follows:

Category

Description

Weighting

1

Qualifications of Specialist and availability of named individuals including national experts

25

2

Adherence to TOR specifications and related requirements: Clear understanding of required deliverables

35

3

Experience with similar work

25

4

Demonstrated track record of success, supported by references

15

 

Total

100

 

 

 

  1. Appendix

 

 

Appendix 1:  Table: List of Endangered Plant Species in Antigua

 

Scientific Name

Common Name

Status in Antigua

Origin

Distribution

Important Notes

Adiantum pyramidale

Pyramid Maidenhair Fern

Endangered

Regional Endemic

Greater and Lesser Antilles; rare in Antigua, only so far recorded at Sawcolts and Christian Valley

 

Agave karatto

Miller Dagger, Century Plant

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

Endemic to Lesser Antilles; widespread in Antigua

 

Furcraea tuberosa

 

Endangered

Regional Endemic

Endemic to Lesser Antilles; uncommon in Antigua, Body Ponds, Hamiltons, lower slopes of the Shekerley Mountains

 

Anthurium grandifolium

 

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

Native of Greater and Lesser Antilles; widespread in Antigua, especially Sugar Loaf and the Shekerley Mountains

 

Monstera adansonii

Schott Monstera

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

Native of Trinidad and Tobago, Lesser Antilles; in Antigua recorded at Shekerley Mountains and Body Ponds

 

Acrocomia aculeata

Macaw Palm

Critically Endangered

Regional Endemic

Endemic to Lesser Antilles; rare in Antigua, recorded at Shekerley Mountains and Body Ponds

 

Coccothrinax barbadensis

Palmetto Palm

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

Endemic to Lesser Antilles; rare in Antigua, recorded at Shekerley Mountains and in Barbuda

 

Roystonea oleracea

Cabbage Palm

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

Endemic to Lesser Antilles; locally uncommon in the wild, recorded at Shekerley Mountains and Body Ponds

The palm is similar to Roystonea regia which is normally cultivated

Vriesea guadalupensis

 

Endangered

Regional Endemic

Endemic to Lesser Antilles; rare in Antigua, recorded at Shekerley Mountains

 

Habenaria alata

Winged Bog Orchid

Vulnerable

Neo Tropics

Rare. In Antigua at Body Ponds and Boggy Peak. A neotropical species

 

Tolumnia urophylla

Yellow Dancing Lady

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

Common. In Antigua, found throughout the Shekerley Mountains, Signal Hill, Nonsuch, coastal woodland on the north east coast and Dockyard. In Barbuda, found occasionally at Palmetto and the interior woodlands. Restricted to the Lesster Antilles

 

Smilax guianensis

 

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

Endemic to Lesser Antilles; in Antigua recorded at the Shekerley Mountains

Occasion blunt prickles are found on this species at the base of the stem.

Oplonia microphylla

 

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

Greater and Lesser Antilles from Jamaica east and south to the Grenadines. Infrequent in the Nelson's Dockyard National Park, Fitches Creek and occasionally elsewhere

 

Tabernaemontana citrifolia

Milky Bush

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

Greater and Lesser Antilles; fairly widely distributed in Antigua: e.g. Morris Looby, Sugar Loaf, Seaforths, Doigs

This Species is IUCN red listed

Ambrosia hispida

 

Endangered

Regional Endemic

Greater and Lesser Antilles, the Bahamas. In Antigua at Long Island and undisturbed coastal areas, especially on the north-eastern coast

 

Chromolaena sinuata

 

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

Tropical America, Monsterrat, La Desirade, Guadeloupe and St Eustatius. In Antigua at Rooms, Willikies, Ayers Creek and Gaynors

 

Gundlachia corybosa

Yam Bush

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

The Greater Antilles, Monsterrat, Guadeloupe, La Desirade and Saba. Common on Barbuda at Palmetto Point, North Beach and Goat Island and at Two Foot Bay along the east coast

 

Argusia gnaphalodes

Sea Lavender

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

West Indies. Occasional in Antigua and Barbuda; Barbuda, north beaches, Soldier Point

 

Cordia cf. reticulata

 

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

Lesser Antilles; Uncommon in Antigua and Barbuda; Nelson's Dockyard National park, Morris Looby, Fig Tree Hill, Wallings

 

Cordia sebestena

Geranium Tree

Endangered

Regional Endemic

Lesser Antilles; Uncommon in Antigua and Barbuda; Nelson's Dockyard National park, Morris Looby, Fig Tree Hill, Wallings

 

Rochefortia acanthophora

 

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

Greater and Lesser Antilles; In Antigua, found in the Nelson's Dockyard National Park, Black Ghaut, Guinea Bush

May be confused with other small spiny shrubs, Oplonia microphylla, Catebaea melanocarpa, Clerodendrum aculeatum, but these species all have paired sppines rather than single ones as for this species.

Tournefortia cf. hirsutissima

 

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

Greater and Lesser Antilles; rare in Antigua, so far only recorded at Fig Tree Drive

Species is very similar to Tournefortia bicolor

Mammillaria nivosa

 

Endangered

Regional Endemic

Native of Greater and Lesser Antilles; rare in Antigua, but recorded on the East Coast and in the Nelson's dockyard National Park, in Barbuda on the North beaches.

 

Melocactus intortus

Turks Cap Cactus

Endangered

Regional Endemic

Native of Greater and Lesser Antilles: Widespread, but increasingly rare in Antigua, recorded at Nelson's Dockyard National Park, Signal Hill and near Barbuda's north beaches

 

Opuntia cf. curassavica

 

Endangered

Regional Endemic

Endemic to Lesser Antiilles: Rare in Antigua, but recorded in the National Park

Species closely resembles O.triacantha.

Opuntia rubescens

Tree Opuntia

Endangered

Regional Endemic

Native of Greater and Lesser Antilles. Rare in the wild in Antigua, recorded on Long Island.

 

Rhipsalis baccifera

 

Critically Endangered

Regional Endemic

Native of Greater and Lesser Antilles; Rare in Antigua, Monteros.

 

Calophyllum calaba

 

Critically Endangered

Regional Endemic

Greater and Lesser Antilles: Locally uncommon, but found on Barbuda, north beach and in Antigua near Bendals.

 

Ipomoea repanda

 

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

Puerto Rico, Lesser Antilles. Locally uncommon, at Sugar Loaf

 

Jacquemontia solanifolia

 

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, Lesser Antilles. Locally at Sugar Loaf

 

Cayaponia americana

Wild Pumpkin

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

West Indies; locally at Claremont, Fig Tree Drive, Wallings

 

Chamaesyce articulata

Milk Shrub

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

Bahamas, Puerto Rico and the Lesser Antilles. Locally at Palmetto Point and Black Ghaut Hills

 

Caesalpinia ciliata x bondue

Warri Bush - Hybrid

Critically Endangered

Antigua

Near Black Ghaut

This hybrid resembles both C. ciliata and C bonduc. The seeds are a mixture of gray, brown and intermediate colours, the inflorescences have bracts intermediate between the two. The stem prickles and bracts resemble C. ciliata. This

Sapium caribaeum

Milk Tree

Endangered

Regional Endemic

Endemic to the Lesser Antilles; locally found in the Shekerley Mountains and Fig Tree Drive

 

Lonchocarpus violaceus

White Lancepod

Critically Endangered

Antigua

Only known in Mount Obama / Boggy Peak

 

Acacia muricata

Spineless Wattle

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

Greatter and Lesser Antilles; locally at Sugar Loaf, Ayers Creek and the Shekerley Mountains, Forest on Stones

 

Psittacanthus martinicensis

Man 'pon Tree

Endangered

Regional Endemic

Lesser Antilees; In Antigua, uncommon but found in the Shekerley Mountains

 

Malpighia linearis

Stinging Cherry

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

Endemic to the West Indies. National Park, Guinea Bush, Doigs and Guiana island

Although most species in this genus have T-shaped hairs on the underside of the bade, this is the only species which imparts a noticeable itchiness when rubbed on the skin

Malpighiamartinicensis

Wild Cherry

Endangered

Regional Endemic

Endemic to the Lesser Antilles. National Park, Doigs.

Hybrids seem to exist which makes identification difficult

Sterculia caribaea

Wild Mahot

Critically Endangered

Regional Endemic

Endemic to Lesser Antilles; rare in Antigua, recorded in body ponds

 

Tetrazygia angustifolia

Broomwood

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

Endemic to Lesser Antilles; In Antigua, Mount Obama

 

Pimenta racemosa

Bay Leaf

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

West Indies, Suriman; locally widespread in the Shekerley Mountains, the Forest on Stones, Body Ponds, Brecknocks, Hamiltons.

 

Psidium longipes var. orbiculare

Mangrove Berry

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

Eastern Bahamas, Turks and Caicos, northern Lesser Antilles; locally in Barbuda at Palmetto Point. Low Bay, the northern beaches and in Antigua at Rooms

 

Ouratea guildingii

 

Endangered

Regional Endemic

Probably endemic to the West Indies although a similar species is reported in Venezuela. Found predominantly in the Forest on Stones and rarely in the Shekerley Mountains

 

Ziziphus reticulata

 

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

Found in Barbuda. Reocrded in Long Island

 

Antirhea acutata

Mutton Polly

Endangered

Regional Endemic

Puerto Rico, Lesser Antilles, Aruba, Bonaire, Curacao; locally in Rooms, Black Ghaut Hills, Rabbit Island in Barbuda.

 

Catesbaea melanocarpa

Urban Blackberry

Endangered

Regional Endemic

Rare in Puerto Rico, St Croix, Guadeloupe; locally found in the Nelson's Dockyard National Park, Doigs, Black Ghaut Hills, Guinea Bush, Morris Looby

 

Catesbaea cf. parviflora

 

Critically Endangered

Regional Endemic

A rare neotropical species; locally found in Black Ghaut Hills

 

Zanthoxylum cf. punctatum

Ramgoat

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

Greater and Lesser Antilles; Locally at Doigs, Forest on Stones, Sugar Loaf, Black Ghaut.

 

Brunfelsia americana

Lady of the Night

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

Hispaniola, Puerto Rico, Lesser Antilles. Antigua in the Shekerley Mountains, Forest on Stones

 

Lycium americanum

 

Vulnerable

Regional Endemic

Cuba, Hispaniola, Trinidad, Lesser Antilles. Inn Antigua the shrub is uncommon, in Rooms.

 

jacquinia berterii

 

Endangered

Regional Endemic

Greater and Lesser Antilles; In Antigua so far recorded only at Pearns.

This species is similar to Jacquinia arborea, but is more compact and with smaller leaves; the few flowers and smaller fruit are more pendulous.

Cissus obovata

 

Endangered

Regional Endemic

Greater Antilles, St Martin, St Barts. Locally rare - found on Barbuda's North Coast and Sugar Loaf

 

Ardisia obovata

 

Endangered

Regional Endemic

West Indies; uncommon in Antigua & Barbuda; Forest on Stones, Sugar Loaf, Fig Tree Hill